QUICK TIPS

Foam Rolling Decreases Post Exercise Soreness

09
Mar
   0 Comments    by orthowell
While reading Mike Reinold's blog I came across this segment of his article. Very interesting! "While foam rolling has become popular, it still is used most often as a way to prepare for training.  However, a recent research report was published in the Journal of Athletic Training that looked at the effect of foam rolling after training on delayed onset muscles soreness (DOMS) and performance. In the study, 8 collegiate men performed a 10×10 squat protocol to completely exhaust their quads and cause DOMS.  The groups performed this two times, once with performing foam rolling afterward and another time without foam rolling.  In the experimental group, foam rolling was performed immediately after squatting, as well as 24- and 48-hours later. Foam rolling for recoveryThe foam rolling procedure consisted of 2 rounds of rolling for 45 seconds each over the quads, adductors, hamstrings, IT band, and Glutes. Results of the study showed that DOMS was significantly reduced when foam rolling was performed.  However, they also discovered 30 meter sprint time, broad-jump distance, and change-of-direction speed were all negatively effected by the presence of DOMS, but the impact was lower if they performed foam rolling."  

Eccentric Exercise Helps Knee Pain

30
Apr
,    0 Comments    by orthowell
Patellar Tendonitis, or runners knee, is a common over-use injury that causes pain and stiffness in the front of the knee. Chronic pain can lead to physiologic changes in the structure of the patellar tendon. This new study from JOSPT shows increased micro-circulation of the patellar tendon after prescribed eccentric exercises. Eccentric exercises are lengthening contractions such as slowly lowering during a squat or slowly bending your knee from a fully straightened position. Eccentric exercise can more readily bring nutrition to the tendon and create a healing environment that will reduce pain and stiffness. This approach is very similar to the eccentric protocol that we use to treat achilles tendonitis. The key is in the exercise prescription-so give us a call!

Are Rotator Cuff Tears Inevitable?

17
Apr
,    0 Comments    by orthowell
Factors For Success With Your Rotator Cuff Repair
As our society stays more active into our later years, shoulder rotator cuff tears are becoming more prevalent. 13% of persons over the age of 50 and 50% of persons over the age of 80 will experience a rotator cuff tear (RCT). 1/3 of these tears will present as pain, loss of ROM, or decrease in function. If conservative measures fail, surgery may be your only option. The study below looked at positive patient outcomes with surgery and the demographics leading into it. Some factors that the patient can control included higher bone mineral density, increased higher level of sport activity and the absence of obesity. If you are preparing yourself for RCT surgery, talk to your PT or PCP on how you can manage your health to set you up for success. CLICK HERE for article.


Knee Scopes: Are they a Sham?

15
Feb
   0 Comments    by orthowell
Is surgery the next step? We read a study that found no statistical difference in the outcomes of people with knee pain that received arthroscopic surgery and those that received a 'sham' surgery! So, before rushing to go under the knife, be sure you convince yourself that all conservative resources have been exhausted and you have truly given your body a chance to heal. Check out the study by clicking HERE.    

Get Rid of "Cold" Inflammation.

09
Jan
   0 Comments    by orthowell
We reviewed an ARTICLE in Precision Nutrition about the effects of chronic inflammation and how to combat it with exercise. Researchers are using the term “cold inflammation” to describe chronic inflammation because it doesn’t have the typical hallmarks of acute inflammation such as fever, heat, or swelling. Cold inflammation is an inflammatory process caused by every day exposure things such as pollution, nutritional deficits, and chronic stress (what’s that?). An uninterrupted cycle of cold inflammation has been linked to obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. This article presents a study published in the Medical Science of Sports and Exercise Journal. The study looked at two groups of healthy, yet obese, post menopausal women. The control group was given patient education and sedentary activity. The other group was given a moderate general resistance training routine to be done 3 times a week for 12 weeks. The results included a reduction of specific inflammation cells between 18% - 33% and an increase in an anti-inflammation markers by 20%! By working with a health care professional or personal trainer to develop a safe resistance program, you can significantly improve your health and reduce your risk of disease.  

Crunches are not the answer!

08
Jan
   0 Comments    by orthowell
Crunches are not the answer! The Huffington Post put out an ARTICLE on 'traditional' abdominal exercises and how they can actually injury the connective tissue in your core. The strength of a muscle is only as good as the structural support system around it. The article give some general exercise but for a more detailed foundation on how to train the core muscles refer to our blog post HERE.

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